FLYING IN TOWNS AND CITIES (OR BUSY AREAS)

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Flying in Cities and Towns

 

 

 If you are flying over or near urban areas or near groups of people, then extra safety rules are in place to provide protection. The rules don’t apply if you are flying indoors

You need to follow the drone and model aircraft code. Some of the key rules are:

 

> never fly higher than 120m / 400ft

> always keep the drone in sight

> Keep clear of airspace restrictions, including around aerodromes, unless you have permission to fly within them

> keep 50m away from uninvolved people, to avoid endangering them.

> In most cases, unless flying a drone that is less than 250g, you must keep at least 150 metres horizontally away from parks, industrial, residential and built-up areas.

And always remember that you are responsible for your

actions while flying.

All of the rules also apply if you are flying at night.

 

If your drone weighs less than 250g then you may overfly a small number of people for a short period of time. But, if you have a heavier drone, or want to fly near or over people for longer periods then it’s most likely you will fall into the Specific category of regulations and may well need a special approval from the Civil Aviation Authority. This may allow you to fly in congested areas and closer to people.

Minimum age to fly In most cases you must be at least 12 years old to fly a drone on your own*.

 

You can fly if you are under 12, but you must be supervised by someone 16 or over and both of you must have passed the flyer ID test.

 

Privacy Wherever you fly your drone, consider the privacy of others. 

If you are under 12 and flying on your own then the drone must either be: privately built and be less than 250g or a toy and marked as a Class C0 drone Registration and flyer ID If your drone has a camera (unless it is a toy) or weighs 250g or more then you need to register with the CAA.

 

You need to renew this registration every year. Anyone flying a drone 250g or more needs to pass a test and get a flyer ID from the CAA. If you already have a flyer ID that is still valid, you don’t need to re-do the test until it expires, although you are required to keep up to date with the new regulations.

More info click here 

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